Comprehensive Understanding of Tooth Extractions

Comprehensive Understanding of Tooth Extractions

December 1, 2020

If your tooth is severely decayed or broken and isn’t repairable by using dental crowns or fillings, your dentist might consider dental extractions as the last resort. However, your dentist will discuss with you your options and make you understand why they opted for a tooth extraction.

Why Do I Need a Tooth Extraction?

There are several reasons why you would need a tooth extraction. Some of them include:

  • Severely decayed tooth
  • Periodontal disease or gum infection
  • Impacted wisdom teeth
  • Crowded teeth when getting orthodontic treatments

Your dentist can remove your tooth through minor dental surgery. However, sometimes the dentist might refer you to an oral surgeon. The tooth extraction procedure is an outpatient treatment. Therefore, your dentist or oral surgeon will release you to go home the same day.

How to Prepare for a Dental Extraction Procedure

Your dentist will guide you on how to prepare for dental extraction in Watsonville. During the preparation appointment, your dentist might ask you about your medical history and the medications you are taking.

If you are scheduled to undergo surgery that requires bisphosphonate anesthesia, the dentist might recommend the tooth extraction before the surgery since the anesthesia drug can cause osteonecrosis.

If you have any underlying medical conditions or allergies, it is advisable to notify your dentist to avoid complications during the procedure. The dentist will then explain to you what will happen and what you can expect during the procedure.

If you have any underlying medical conditions or allergies, it is advisable to notify your dentist to avoid complications during the procedure. The dentist will then explain to you what will happen and what you can expect during the tooth extraction procedure.

Administering Anesthesia

Depending on the number of teeth you need to be removed, the dentist can consider using local or general anesthesia. If you are getting general anesthesia, the dentist will recommend you arrange transport home since you might be feeling drowsy after the dental extraction procedure. Therefore, you might not be able to drive.

The anesthetic drug will numb the site of tooth extraction or the body, depending on the type of anesthesia. However, you might feel pressure while your dentist in Watsonville, CA, is working on your tooth. If you have a dental phobia, the dentist might recommend sedatives to make you feel more comfortable and relaxed during the dental extraction.

Tooth Removal Procedure

Once you are comfortable in the dental office, your dentist will inject the anesthesia and leave it to take effect. The dentist might ask you some questions to confirm that the anesthesia is working.

Since the roots of your teeth sit below the gums, your dentist will widen the socket and use an elevator tool to loosen the teeth. Next, the dentist will use forceps to remove the tooth from the socket. If you are undergoing impacted wisdom teeth extraction, your dentist might cut incisions through the gums and cut the tooth before removing it piece by piece.

Recovery After a Tooth Extraction

After tooth extraction, your dentist will place a gauze pad on the socket to stop bleeding. The dentist will then ask you to bite down the gauze pad to control bleeding and encourage clotting. If you have swelling, the dentist near you will recommend you place an ice pack on the face over the site of tooth extraction.

Most people can get back to their daily routines after tooth extraction. However, if you have had a complex dental extraction, the dentist will recommend you take some days of rest, encouraging recovery.

During the first week, you might need to eat soft foods to prevent irritating the socket. Some other measures you can take for fast recovery after the tooth extraction include:

  • Avoid rinsing your mouth for the first 24 hours since you can dislodge the blood clot
  • Rinse your mouth with warm saline water after the first 24 hours to prevent infections
  • If your socket bleeds, you can bite down a teabag to prevent excessive blood loss
  • Don’t smoke or limit alcohol use since they slow down recovery
  • Brush your teeth regularly, leaving out the socket

If you experience any complications during the recovery period, you can contact us at Watsonville Family Dental for guidance and treatments.